Pascale Steven

Pascale Steven

No Direction Home

Pascale Steven

No Direction Home

“…the great flood-gates of the wonder-world swung open, and in the wild conceits that swayed me to my purpose, two and two there floated into my inmost soul, endless processions of the whale, and, mid most of them all, one grand hooded phantom, like a snow hill in the air.”

Moby Dick, Herman Melville

This exhibition is the culmination of a two months residency at St Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse, part of Art Arcadia Summer Residency Programme 2018.
In Pascale Steven’s work reference points are various and overlapping. Initially a response to a reading of Moby Dick and some of the symbolism suggested by the text.
It subsequently became a response to place, the architectural space and it’s religious role. Some references within the work are autobiographical, some are purely invented fictions. It became a study in communication in its varying forms, and an examination of what might be meant as soul, this being one of the primary lines of enquiry within religion. It remains at this point a work in progress focused on notions of home, orientation and belonging.

Pascale Steven was born in London and studied fine art at The University of East London. Exhibitions include Tracer at The Project Arts Centre Dublin, Erasure at The Old Museum Belfast and Tomorrow’s Almost Over at Void Derry along with Invisible Portraits, a Derry City of Culture Project at Void.












Blog


Sue Morris

Sue Morris

The Past Runs Very Close

Sue Morris

The Past Runs Very Close

‘Perhaps it might be said rightly that there are three times: a time present of things past; a time present of things present; and a time present of things future. For these three do exist somewhere in the soul, for otherwise I could not see them’

Book XI, Time and Eternity; St Augustine 5th century AD

***

‘To understand ourselves means to reflect on time. But to understand time we need to reflect on ourselves’.

Carlo Rovelli, The Order of Time

We take it as given that time flows in rhythmic, uniform, universal, formation. Minutes become hours, hours become days, days become weeks. We look to our watches, phones, laptops and public clocks as devices for ordering our days.
The first recorded examples of mechanical clocks are found in the 14th century. In the following, century, measured time was commonly found in structured communities, most often in the form of a village bell. By the 18th century, time as we recognize it had become a fundamental system across Europe. In towns and cities, especially, clocks were now integral in the development of timed industrial activity and integrated transport systems.
Paradoxically, as mechanized time evolved, physicists, mathematicians, philosophers and theologians were questioning its validity. Today, contemporary theoretical physics states that ‘time’ as we understand it – consistent, ordered, objective – does not exist.
So what is this leaky vessel we call time? How do we reconcile its apparent non-existence with the sense of past, present and future that we carry and experience through our everyday lives?
Drawing on the writings of, among others, Carlo Rovelli, theoretical physicist, and St Augustine, theologian/philosopher, visual artist, Sue Morris, contemplates the subjective nature of time and how memory may hold the key.

Sue Morris was born in England and is a graduate of the Royal College of Art, London. Since the early nineties she has lived in Ireland, most recently in Derry, Northern Ireland. Her multidisciplinary practice utilizes drawing, text, printmaking, film, photography, sound and installation. Her work explores notions of the known and unknown particularly around re-imagined and alternative histories.

Selected exhibitions include those at; the Lockhart Gallery, State University New York, USA (2012); the Kunstverein Galerie, Baden bei Wien (2012) and museumORTH, Orth an der Danau, Austria (2013), as part of the International Cultural Programme for Ireland’s Presidency of the EU; Tartu Loomemajanduskeskus, Estonia (2014); Artisterium 7, Tbilisi, Georgia (2014); the State Institute of Culture, Moscow, Russia (2016) the Cultural Centre of Moschato, Athens, Greece (2017) and the 16:9 Gallery, Lawrence University, Michigan, USA (2018).

She has had recent residencies at AIR Krems, Austria (2012); Trükimuuseum, Tartu, Estonia (2013); the Heinrich Böll Residency, Achill Island (2015), and the Art Arcadia residency in St Augustine’s, Derry (2018).


















Blog


Stephanie Gaumond

Stephanie Gaumond

Repeat

Stephanie Gaumond

Repeat

‘We are presented with an unpleasant choice between either committing to peculiar concepts about immaterial deities or letting go entirely of a host of consoling, subtle or just charming rituals for which we struggle to find equivalents in secular society.’

Alain de Botton, Religion for Atheists

A week-long residency at the Old Schoolhouse at St. Augustine’s prompted an investigation of the space both aesthetically and conceptually. Out of this came a series of works in response to two major reference points: architecture and repetition.

These two concepts, both utilised by religion, relate naturally to the secular process of printmaking. The artist uses her experience of the printmaking studio as a structure to create an environment in which architecture and repetition illuminate how humans create institutions; and why they seem to be so integral to us as human beings.

Stephanie Gaumond is a printmaker raised in Denver, Colorado. She received her Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Denver and her Masters in Fine Art Practice from the Glasgow School of Art. Her work explores patterns and coded communication. She lives and works in Derry/Londonderry N. Ireland.
Selected exhibitions include those at: Glebe Gallery, Churchill, Donegal, Ireland (2018); SGC International Printmaking Conference, Las Vegas, NV (2018); The Social Studios and Gallery Derry/Londonderry (2015) Victoria H. Myhren Gallery, Denver, Colorado (2013); The Glue Factory, Glasgow, Scotland (2013); Mediakesukus Lume, Helsinki, Finland (2012)















Blog


Gail Mahon

Gail Mahon

Controchasm: Circling The Vernacular

Gail Mahon

Controchasm: Circling The Vernacular

A liminal space for interaction and readings in stillness, slow and suspended movements, finds Controchasm: Circling the Vernacular as an adaption to the environment as grounds to reset, reform and recalibrate the spaces in between cultural construction, primal restlessness and an intensification of the digital lens. A confinement in architectural space, unearths rootedness and opens beginnings with which to build though a process of disciplined focus and retention of space to settle conditions of plural identity and make new speculations to mediate balance underfoot. The works shown include spatial drawings, clay works and interaction films as the artists’ time spent in 3 week residency at St. Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse and as the beginnings to new direction within her practice.

Gail Mahon is an artist and researcher based between Northern Ireland and London travelling to develop projects across installation, ceramic sculptures, performance actions and interdisciplinary collaborations. Mahon often draws focus by viewing the body as material culture; bio-architecture affected at both macro and micro levels with transformative foundations that are permeable and non-fixed. Through a practice of unmaking and remaking, transformative connections in reductive functionality, physical effort and social conditions, lead speculations upon the integrity of humanness; its cultural consumption, expanding dimensionalities and the residual afterimages left behind.

Having previously shown work in Ireland, Italy, U.K and China, she has recently completed her Masters at the Royal College of Art in London. She also works collaboratively across various projects as lead artist in CAAKE, collaborative group with other visual artists, makers and performers and develops site specific exhibitions and residencies in Northern Ireland as collective member in MAK9. Recent shows include In Search of the Vernacular, Oriel Myrddn Gallery, Carmarthen; Residue, Galway Arts Centre; Two Hundred Acres, Pumphouse Gallery, London and the Lucanio Benetton ‘Imago Mundi’ Collection, Italy.












Blog


Anne-Marie McKee

Anne-Marie McKee

I am not here

Anne-Marie McKee

I am not here

Anne-Marie McKee has used this residency to create a studio, somewhere to pick up her practice after a two year gap. Her interest is in the structure and scaffolding of a studio to produce and display art. This might be using the steps of a ladder to show drawings, it might be a place to track the movements of the sun with gouache on yellow tent material. It might be a place to take a nap. The end-of-residency exhibition celebrates the studio as a workplace, made in a spirit of enquiry and experiments in drawing.

Why yellow?
Sun, pollen, egg yolks, tempera, smiley face pills, halos, begonias, laburnum.
Turner, sulphur. Aniline, liver failure.
Cadmium, United Fruit Company trademark ochre. Lutein. Goya’s Perro semihundido.

Installation, lithograph and drawings, ladder, drawing board, chair, fabrics, drawings on birch ply, lithograph, chair, acetate, strimmer wire, tent material, tempera, watercolour and gouache.

A graduate of Glasgow School of Art 2016 (Masters of Letters in Fine Art Practice: Drawing), Anne-Marie McKee also holds a PhD in Botany. McKee’s practice deals with a resistance or reluctance to the pinning down of knowledge. It draws on scientific vocabulary, botanical research, herbarium protocols and medieval manuscripts. Nature is both subject and a material in her work.















Blog


Intra Muros

Intra Muros

Stephanie Gaumand | Gail Mahon | Anne-Marie McKee | Sue Morris | Pascale Steven

Intra Muros

Stephanie Gaumond
Gail Mahon
Anne-Marie McKee
Sue Morris
Pascale Steven

Intra Muros: Latin phrase
in·tra mu·ros ˌin-trä-ˈmü-ˌrōs
: within the (city) walls : within the (religious) community : internal : not public

As part of The Walled City 400 Years celebrations five local artists explore the many meanings and nuances of the Latin expression Intra Muros through a series of multimedia works researched and produced in situ at St Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse.

This exhibition is kindly funded by DCSDC as part of The Walled City 400 Years celebrations.
We would like to thank Rev. Malcolm Ferry and all the volunteers at St Augustine’s for welcoming us and for their kindness and patience during our six-month stay at the Old Schoolhouse.






















Valeria Pierini

Valeria Pierini

Almost

Valeria Pierini

Almost

Almost is a project consisting of four chapters/tenses: beat time – watch – tell – to think. With each chapter/tense Pierini set out to articulate the city of Derry by creating new spaces: ‘to beat time’ attempts to capture time – streams of images as a metaphor; ‘to watch’ extrapolates subjects from their context, almost surreally – the opposite of documentation; ‘to think’ becomes imagining. In ‘to tell’ Pierini collected stories and anecdotes, relating to the city walls, from the local community and paired them with forensic images. In contrast to the work in the previous chapters, in this last one Pierini withdraws, putting the collective narrative at the centerstage.

Valeria Pierini is an Italian lens-based artist. Her practice revolves around photography, philosophy and literature, with a special attention to storytelling through images and words. She graduated at the University of Perugia in 2014 and has since exhibited in Italy and Spain and published her work in monographic catalogues. Pierini is Art Arcadia’s first international artist in residency at St Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse and with her residency and exhibition she inaugurated the new Art Arcadia programme for 2019/2020.












Blog


Locky Morris

Locky Morris

These Frail Monuments

Locky Morris

These Frail Monuments

During his Art Arcadia residency at St Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse, Locky Morris has developed artworks around St Augustine’s Old Graveyard. The project, titled ‘these frail monuments’ is loosely based on an extract of text from one of its huge broken gravestone slabs. He points out though that he first came across it in “The Little Church on the Walls”, Hazel Philon’s book on the 1500-year history of the site – as it is only just about legible today having faded considerably, according to Philson over the last number of years – it is carved into the tombstone slab of a former mayor of the city and his wife from the early 1700s. Typical of the (indirect) approach of this artist he did not limit himself to ‘gods little acre’ during the residency but riffed around this idea of frail monuments in time from the graveyard and church itself to take in the wider city. The exhibition, Instagram takeover and blogs, that ran alongside during his stay at St Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse, show aspects of the intuitive, associative and free flowing nature of his process.

Locky Morris’s work, spanning over three decades, has been marked by a persistent recurring focus centred around his immediate terrain. His current practice has, for the most part, been marked by a concentration on the familial and the familiar – sourcing a large amount of his material directly from the interstices and interactions of life, ‘..where it seems as if he is trying to establish the border between humanity and the appearance of humanity..’. Often underpinned by humour and sometimes triggered by what he refers to as ‘daily epiphanies’ his assemblages place an emphasis on observation, perceptual manipulation and the physical nature of sound.












Instagram takeover


La Bratts

La Bratts

Disembodied Voices

La Bratts

Disembodied Voices

The Monday Lab presents “Disembodied Voices” a residency and performance by La Bratts (James King and Peter O’Doherty).

James and Peter will be resident at St. Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse from 11 – 15 June 2019, as guest artists of Art Arcadia, preparing materials, soundscapes, videos and honing ideas for Saturday’s durational performance.
Some of these activities will be performative and may be observed at St. Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse or in the vicinity.

The residency will conclude on 15th June with an eight-hour durational performance from 11.00 – 19.00. This will take the form of a structured ritualised process interjected with accidental diversions, including improvisations with objects. Visitors are welcome to stay for the whole period, to share in the experience of a developing process, or to come and go and enjoy something of value from short episodes. Visitors are invited to bring an object for the artists’ use on Saturday, something that may be interesting or even challenging to work with.

About La Bratts
La Bratts (James King and Peter O’Doherty) has emerged as a collaborative duo from “The Monday Lab” performance research group, which meets weekly in Derry to offer a platform to artists, musicians, performers and fellow travelers to develop new work, perform and receive peer feed-back.

La Bratts’ work tends towards text-based vocal experimentation and action, favouring the distillation of language into its fundamental sounds and sources. Their collaborations aim to be well-formed and spontaneous.













Sue Morris

Sue Morris

Analogue Days

Sue Morris

Analogue Days

‘Place can never be generalized like it is on the Euro notes; it will always connect to somewhere in our autobiographies – future and past. It is an amorphous ungainly feeling that enables us to articulate feelings of familiarity or estrangement, and for the most part is better left ignored because it can be unbearable’

Tacita Dean, Place (2005)

Sue Morris moved from London to Coolaney, a remote village in County Sligo, Ireland, in the early nineties where she lived for 23 years before relocating to Derry 4 years ago.

In April 2019 she undertook a residency in the rural village of Pietrafitta, Italy.

The villages of Coolaney and Pietrafitta, separated by 1,700 miles, and located in different countries, bear striking similarities. Both are located in mountainous regions (the Ox Mountains and the Apennine Mountains respectively) and consist of a Main Street with a Community Centre and church at the heart. Both had post offices that closed some time ago, limited public transport (one bus a day) and schools under threat (the school in Pietrafitta has long since gone). They shared a similar size population, including a small cohort of émigrés. Economically, both regions relied on small-scale agriculture and had been impacted by rural depopulation.

However, while Pietrafitta’s economy and population remains in decline, the village maintains a strong sense of pride, communality and local traditions. In contrast, Coolaney boomed under the Celtic Tiger. The village is now surrounded by satellite housing estates; its close-knit community and traditional way of life ruptured.

In Analogue Days the autobiographical is examined in parallel to wider economic, social and cultural contexts. The work is restricted to the use of analogue technology – notebooks, a typewriter, cyanotype and polaroid/disposable/pinhole cameras. It investigates the impact of rural depopulation and emigration. In so doing, it seeks to understand what it means to live somewhere – to remain/leave/return – and the temporal nature of change.





















Blog