Housing

Housing

Ciara Finnegan Anne-Marie McKee David Jacques

Housing

artist residency July - September 2022

exhibition opens on Culture Night 23 September 6-9pm

Continues until 1 October

Housing

Once upon a time there were three little/minor? artists. For many, many years they lived happily in their family homes, drawing and painting, making experimental films and reading critical theory, until one day their mothers said: “Why the heck are you still living here?! Get out and get yourself a real job and your own house! It’s time you left to explore the world beyond this house.” So the artists reluctantly packed their bags and left.

Somewhere along this narrative route, they met a woman with some architectural plans. The woman said to the three artists, “Would you like to use these plans to build your houses?” and the artists said: “Yes, please!”

One artist built a house out of woven polypropylene sacking.

Another artist built a house out of hardboard.

And the other artist built a house out of plexiglass.

On Culture Night this surreal estate will sit in Art Arcadia. A terrace row of sorts; each house built from exactly the same plans with exactly the same dimensions and sharing a common plumbing system (which is dodgy enough to allow a seepage of thought between the houses, ideas leaking from one to another to another.) At the same time, each house stands apart, distinctly different from its neighbours, coloured by the imagination of the artist housed there.

Anne-Marie McKee:

Anne-Marie McKee is an artist, researcher, collaborator, organiser. A graduate of Glasgow School of Art, in 2017, she set up Clarendon Street Studios in Derry to provide affordable studios for fellow professional visual artists. She founded Wild Tulips Gallery, Derry (2019) - an initiative of Clarendon Street Studios that commissioned new work from artists in the Northwest of Ireland with an international reach. Former Chairperson of 126 Artist-run Gallery, Galway, Ireland (2012-2013). Curatorial intern for curator Megs Morley during TULCA Festival of Visual Arts 2011 in Galway.

Anne-Marie’s practice is currently working around the idea of Thin Places. THIN PLACES have long been investigated by artists and philosophers as a way of connecting our geography, psychogeography and earth spirituality at certain loci. Thin places refer to areas where there is a connection to another plane or an altered sense of reality - where there is a rift or a connection to another place. For some people, Thin places are liminal spaces found on the tops of mountains; for some, it is on or in the sea; or stone circles; for some it is working with horses. Thin places provide a metaphorical space in which Anne-Marie explores a sense of the self embedded in the landscape.

David Jacques:

David Jacques is a multimedia Artist based in Liverpool UK. His current practice deals with Eco-Political situations using layered, surreal narratives. For the housing residency he has set up an encounter between the Dollhouse, a mass of oil & gas pipes infused with a wild animism and a puck-like figure known as ‘The Oil Drop Kid’, a distorted take on Esso Oils’ mascot from the 1950’s.

Ciara Finnegan:

People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones, have sex, eat, urinate, defecate, be ill, wear shoes. (even sleeping’s risky - all that nocturnal shedding of skin onto crisp sheets…) People who live in glass houses shouldn’t. They just shouldn’t. But they do.

Ah, Modernism! Your architecture and familiar art forms! How we hate you for recoiling at right-angles from life’s viscera, the smears it leaves behind, its smudging of surfaces… (The demands of modernist design weigh heavily on the cleaner.) And yet, somewhere, deep down, do we not secretly crave the peace of your straight lines, your smooth surfaces, your mathematical eloquence?

In ‘Housing’ I draw on Malcolm Turvey’s analysis of the work of film-maker, Jacques Tati, in his excellent study: Play Time Jacques Tati and Comedic Modernism. With reference to Tati’s notion of democratic comedy and a love/hate relationship with modernist design, I poke at issues around transparency and privacy in the contemporary age, playing with hyperbolic figurative sculptures, slapstick, staged and unstaged gags in the Plexiglass Dollhouse.

This residency is in partnership with the Liverpool Irish Festival, The Dollhouse Space and St Augustine’s Heritage Site. It is funded by Derry City & Strabane District Council and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland.

The Nodal Dollhouse Space


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Laura McCafferty

Laura McCafferty

Shape of the Place

Shape of the Place

artist residency May - June 2022

exhibition 24 June - 2 July

Laura McCafferty

Laura McCafferty’s current practice combines paper collage, drawing and large-scale textiles in brightly coloured, boldly patterned cotton. Sitting on the edge of narrative, this work subtly messes with what’s expected. Often using repetitive  processes, the act of making innately assumes great importance. Whilst admitting the absurdity of the tasks, she remains unashamed by the joy invested in her labour. Cutting, sticking and piecing together, one thing leading to another, she describes her making process as both purposeful and futile. 

The residency at Art Arcadia gave Laura the space to unify scattered ideas, bringing elements together while simultaneously letting it unravel. Over the course of the residency, she unearthed the significance of place in her practice, seeing it as something that underpins the research; its substance moving between a response to the space, a disconnection to a place or her relocation to the North West after twenty years. Exploring these new yet familiar surroundings through shape, colour, pattern and process, Laura brings it closer to its surface. Shape of the Place finds its beginnings in a new rural context; through walking and searching, she seeks out incidental peculiarities. From 2020–2022 Laura used paper collage to reimagine found patterns in new colourways with repeated motifs, using the organic shapes to bring a sense of motion to the work. 

The time at Art Arcadia gave Laura the opportunity to realise this body of work which consists of a growing collection of photographs, paper collages and quilted textile panels.  Laura completed three new works including forwardsbackwards/forwards – a five and a half metre wide textile version of six collages made in 2022 from leftover strips of paper. The piece is made to fit the space, yet at the same time block a section of it off – the colours seem random and the diagonal strips of cloth are wider than in previous works. The softness of the textile is in contrast to the rigidity of the paper collage work. For Laura, forwardsbackwards/forwards is a way of going back to go forward, resuming motion in all directions. STRUT is a wooden construction holding four  quilted textile panels. You are invited to imagine four bodies holding these panels up as they attempt to fall down. pop-up is free-standing, and can move from place to place and appear where it wants, when it wants. The viewer is invited to move around the works to see things from all sides. 

Laura McCafferty is originally from Derry, Northern Ireland and now based in Donegal. She moved to Nottingham in 2000 to study Decorative Arts at Nottingham Trent University, graduating in 2003. She established a studio-based practice making textile artworks using appliqué, screen-print and hand embroidery. Exhibiting nationally and internationally gaining  widespread recognition, her work is part of both public and private collections. In 2012, Laura completed an MFA in Fine Art at Goldsmiths University, London, graduating in 2016 with Distinction. Until 2020 she was Associate Lecturer in Fine Art  at Nottingham Trent University and a trustee of UK New Artists. Returning to Ireland in 2020 to take up the role of Public Programmes Curator at CCA Derry~Londonderry, Laura now situates her art practice in Donegal and the North West. 

lauramccafferty.com @laura_mc_cafferty

This residency is in partnership with St Augustine’s Heritage Site and is funded by Derry City & Strabane District Council and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland.

Exhibition

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Abridged 0-90

Abridged 0-91: Waterside

Abridged 0-91: Waterside

remote residency April 2022

Waterside, Derry NI

Abridged 0-91: Waterside

There’s a city called Derry. Or Londonderry. Or Derry/Londonderry. Or Doire. Or a myriad of other things. Calling it Derry, Londonderry, Derry/Londonderry, Doire or this myriad of other things doesn’t of course pay the rent. Within this city is a place called the Waterside. The Waterside is brimful of housing estates, shops and the odd park. The Waterside is opposite the Cityside which is also brimful of housing estates, shops and the odd park. Inhabitants of the Waterside and Cityside traditionally follow different variants of Christianity and in each there are different coloured pieces of cloth hanging limply from lampposts. Gregory McCartney, one of the people behind Abridged, a dastardly poetry and art magazine was born and lives in the Waterside. He’s sure it isn’t impressed.

I didn’t ask to be born. The anguished cry of ever angst-ridden teen. Well, I didn’t ask to be part of your history either. We’re born naked of creed and culture. These things are wrapped around us at birth, a dark swaddling. We were marked out at birth and then marked again and again throughout our lives by the great gods of narrative. A weird Calvinistic determinism, gothic in its blinkers. It takes away free will. It abridges you. The Abridged originated on a Waterside council estate. I always found it funny that Estate in Italian means ‘summer’ and Clooney (the name of said estate) roughly translates as ‘meadow’. I grew up in a summer meadow! There’s going to be an attempt here to chart things that were, but never just were, the walls and the squares, the codes and the structures. There were good people there, bad people there, very bad people there, and the rest of us making the best of it. This is an attempt to map out the past, to find out the staging posts to a strange little magazine. It’s kind of prophecy in reverse.

This residency is in partnership with St Augustine’s Heritage Site and it is funded by  Derry City & Strabane District Council.

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Adam Sébire

Adam Sébire

sikujumaataarooq : waiting for sea ice

sikujumaataarooq : waiting for sea ice

remote residency 1-31 March 2022

Uummannaq, Greenland and Arctic Norway

Adam Sébire

Sikujuippoq is a northwest Greenlandic word for the disappearance of the sea ice.  Cryosphere scientists predict the North Pole may be free of sea ice some summers before 2050.  But as the Arctic warms four times as fast as the rest of the planet, how are its winters changing? From the 1st of March, Adam Sébire will be offering photo-video vignettes collected in Uummannaq, a remote Inuit settlement at 70.4ºN, as he waited for the sea ice to form.

Australian artist Adam Sébire was on his way from Svalbard to Greenland for PhD research into visual representation of climate change when the Covid-19 pandemic hit, marooning him in a windswept North Sea lighthouse.  He thus rode out the first three months of the pandemic in the ultimate location for social distancing, which gave rise to his Art Arcadia Lockdown Residency in May 2020.

Delayed a further 16 months in northern Norway due to Australia’s border closures, Adam finally arrived in Uummannaq in December 2021 to document formation of the winter sea ice.  His second appearance for Art Arcadia is therefore via "Remote Residency” with extra emphasis on “remote": begun in northwest Greenland, completed in the Norwegian Arctic, and brought to you on Art Arcadia's Instagram channel and website during the month of March 2022.

This residency is in partnership with St Augustine’s Heritage Site and it is funded by  Derry City & Strabane District Council.

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Liverpool Irish Festival

Liverpool Irish Festival 2021

quantum foam

Rhythm of Chance

a sound performance and experiment by Quantum Foam

27 October 2021

static Liverpool

Rhythm of Chance
a sound performance and experiment
by Quantum Foam

Will it be sunny? Will it be windy? What are the chances? 

Rhythm of Chance is Derry-based artist Edy Fung (alias Quantum Foam)’s continued discovery of the history of weather in Ireland following her research mapping of Liverpool’s Royal Charter shipwreck in the Irish Sea to the advancement of weather forecasting - the critical turn when atmospheric phenomena perceived as uncertain acts of god became deterministic occurrences. At Static Trading Co., a series of weather proverbs in Irish folklores of how to tell the weather is unveiled. These texts, suggesting an ambiguous sense of causality (or not), are visually presented in sets of random functions in collaboration with artist Flor de Fuego. Edy will explore via this sound performance, which imagines a sequence of narratives around the wind, to deconstruct the audio into shuffle-able components, open for a stochastic takeover.

Weather undetermined, nevertheless (permitted).

This project is part of an ongoing Art Arcadia partnership with the Liverpool Irish Festival. It is funded by Derry City & Strabane District Council and The Community Foundation NI. Special thanks to Static Liverpool for hosting the performance.

Photo credit: E. Smith, courtesy of LivIrishFest (2021)

performance


James King | Peter O'Doherty

James King and Peter O'Doherty

words, presence, traces

words, presence, traces

artist residency November 2021

performance 25 November 7-8pm

with public rehearsal from 12 noon

James King and Peter O'Doherty

words, presence, traces

James King and Peter O’Doherty will create a new piece of work during their residency at Art Arcadia at St. Augustine’s Old School house. The essence of the artists’ work is collaborative voice experimentation. Drawing upon computer-generated texts and unorthodox writing which is deconstructed in performance, the residency will conclude with an immersive sound installation.

The residency period will be spent preparing materials and honing ideas for a day-long immersive sound installation and a concluding performance on 25 November. Some of these preparatory activities will be performative, at St. Augustine's Old Schoolhouse or in the vicinity. The concluding performance will take the form of a structured ritualised process interjected with aural diversions, including improvisations with sound and voices. Visitors are welcome to stay for the whole performance, to share in the experience of a developing process, or to come and go and enjoy something of value from short episodes.

This project continues the pair’s exploration of textual manipulation, sound poetry and vocal performance.

James King is a Derry-based performance artist. He retired as a Lecturer in Community Drama at the University of Ulster in 2004, after thirty years in post. He specialised in systems or forms of social and community drama, including Playback Theatre, Action Theatre, Theatre of the Oppressed and Environmental Theatre Processes. Integral to these forms were improvisation and group interaction. Throughout these years he also engaged in Agit prop Street Theatre, Clowning and experimental street events. Since retirement he continued with much of this activity including Street Art performance, conference performances of Action Theater in relation to social issues and spontaneous cabaret performances. For five years he performed sound poetry and spoken word improvisations at open mic sessions locally and nationally. This fed into an evolving Performance Art practice, which was nurtured by the performance art collective, Bbeyond Belfast, particularly during their monthly group performance events, which are held in public outdoor spaces and galleries. He helped establish a local tributary of Bbeyond, BBDB which makes weekly group performances in Derry until the start of the Covid pandemic. Since then he runs a weekly Zoom happening in conjunction with Bbeyond. He and Peter O’Doherty have formed a mutually-enriching working relationship, focusing upon text-based and spontaneous vocal explorations.

Peter O’Doherty is a Derry-based composer and sound artist. He makes work for and with human performers, computers and (sound) objects. His work often deals with memory, time, language and the relationship between text, code and gesture. His music and sound works have been performed in Ireland, Scotland, the former Yugoslavia, Finland and The Netherlands. and his texts published in several publications, including Found Poetry Review. Since 2016 he has been director of Northern Lights Project, a Derry-based organisation he founded to promote new music and since 2019 has jointly curated with Rob Casey (Ulster University) “Derry Sound Factory”, a monthly experimental music series. He performs regularly as part of an improvisation duo with performance artist James King, most recently in June 2019 (“Disembodied Voices”, at St. Augustine’s Old Schoolhouse, Derry) and as a solo performer in March 2019 (“Strategies for be(com)ing a body”, Flax Art Studios, Belfast).

This residency is in partnership with St Augustine’s Heritage Site and is funded by Derry City & Strabane District Council and The Community Foundation NI.

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David Haughey

David Haughey

We Moved Along, One Behind the Other

We Moved Along, One Behind the Other

artist residency September - October 2021

exhibition 5 - 13 November

David Haughey

The installation We Moved Along, One Behind the Other, developed by David Haughey during his residency at Art Arcadia, approaches Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy through its translations to cinema and secondary texts. A principal concern that became apparent in this arrangement of space, video and painting, is the subject of the guide and the wayfarer, the pedagogue and their vessel. Through digital recreation, the work appropriates and reframes spaces from Michelangelo Antonioni’s Red Desert, extending the installation into a speculative field beyond the conventions of cinema, painting and the exhibition.

Within Haughey’s practice, painting is positioned as an anchor, a point of navigation such that peripheral actions and processes are organised and tacitly ordered by this temporal container. The video forming part of this installation sequences the fragmentary research, texts and images that appeared during his residency. Circular and repetitive, the temporal structure of this projection work – particular to the context presented by Saint Augustine’s Schoolhouse – hopes to open up chains of association through a cinematic experience, where no single part is considered more important than any other, and all points are points of departure. The subtitles function autonomously, neither beginning nor end, but connected to the greater part.

In Red Desert, Antonioni stages the clash of old and new through the interplay of history, physical space, and their relative objects and stagings. This installation extracts one image from Dante’s Inferno, the cloaked figures of Canto XXIII, but erases the moralistic intent and recasts the painting and representation within a broader constellation of digital synthesis, image-making and association. The edition of Abridged magazine titled Dominion that will launch simultaneously with this exhibition further extends the installation presenting a series of images made during Haughey’s residency. David Haughey completed a PhD at Ulster University in 2021 and has shown work nationally and internationally since 2001. Details about his artistic practice can be found at www.davidhaughey.com/

This residency is in partnership with St Augustine’s Heritage Site and it is under the patronage of the Comitato Nazionale Dante 2021 and the Italian Ministry of Culture, in occasion of the celebrations for the 700 years of Dante Alighieri. It is funded by The Arts Council of Northern Ireland, Derry City & Strabane District Council and The Community Foundation NI.

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